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Payoyo

  • From Grazalema, a high-altitude nature preserve
  • Made from 85% goat’s milk, 15% sheep’s milk
  • Handmade in Villaluenga del Rosario, population 471
  • From local Payoyo goats and Grazalema sheep
  • Named Best Cheese in Spain 201

payoyoPayoyo is so delicious it was named Spain’s Best Cheese by the Ministry of Agriculture in its category in 2013. Plus it won a bronze medal in 2014 from the World’s Best Cheese awards.

Before you indulge, tempt your taste buds by enjoying the cheese’s aroma and find hints of herbs, butter and cheesecake. Then place a thin slice on your tongue where it will melt and release its sweet, perfectly salted flavor followed by a welcome, tangy finish. Add this lesser known cheese to your cheese or tapas platter, enjoy with crusty bread or simply pair bites with a medium-bodied red wine or dry sherry.

Payoyo cheese is crafted out of loyalty to the classic cheeses of the region. Produced from the goats and sheep of local farmers in Grazalema, it is recognized in the catalog of traditional cheeses from Spain and the European Economic Community. The Payoyo goats are a rare and prized breed whose milk has contributed to this cheese’s internationally celebrated and award winning status.
Grazalema is a beautiful, rugged, mountainous area in the province of Cádiz. Surprisingly, for a town in Andalucía, it is the rainiest place in Spain due to the fact that the mountains around it are the first barriers that the clouds from the Atlantic Ocean meet upon hitting land. Much of the region is a nature park since a reserve was established there in 1977.

Why not talk about our new wines!!

PARA EL BLOG.docxBodegas Itsasmendi (meaning sea and mountains in Basque) produce three world class wines from one of Spain’s most renowned winemakers. Just a stones throw from her hometown of Bilbao, in the heart of the Basque Country, winemaker Ana Martín is using her local knowledge and expertise to produce 3 distinctive Txakolí wines made in the Biscaya Hills near Guernica. An original young Txakolí with bags of personality sits alongside the innovative barrel fermented Itasmendi No.7, while the perfectly balanced Urezti (meaning honeyed water) late harvest wine is one of the most unique wines you are likely to taste.

With only 30ha vineyards, and an average yield of 7,500 to 8,500 kgrs per hectare, this is very small production! The two native varieties of the area, Hondarrabi Zuri and Hondarrabi Zuri Zerratie – easier to say than spell! – are perfectly suited to the local terroir and climate and produce original and authentic Txacoli wines. Vines are all planted facing south to ensure maximum exposure to the sun, which is much needed in this area. With extreme weather conditions, harvest is much later than the neighbouring areas. Sustainable viticulture and environmentally friendly winemaking also help stamp their mark on the personality of this Txakoli.

A young, fruit-forward Txakolí, which is easy drinking. In the mouth it is balanced, fresh and long, with an appealing slight bitterness on the finish, an agreeable characteristic of this variety. An Atlantic wine, reflecting where it is made and Itsasmendi’s vitiicultural and wine-making philosophy.

Pimientos del Padron

Pimientos del Padron.docxPimientos del Padron, are a variety of peppers from the municipality of Padrón in the province of La Coruña, northwestern Spain. These are small peppers (about 5 cm long), with a color ranging from bright green to yellowish green. Their peculiarity lies on the fact that, while their taste is usually mild, a minority (about 20%) are particularly hot. Whether a given pepper ends up being hot or mild depends on the amount of water and sunlight it receives during its growth.

The peppers are customarily fried in oil and served as tapas. Padrón peppers (Spanish: pimientos de Padrón) are a variety of peppers from the municipality of Padrón in the province of La Coruña, northwestern Spain. These are small peppers (about 5 cm long), with a color ranging from bright green to yellowish green. Their peculiarity lies on the fact that, while their taste is usually mild, a minority (about 20%) are particularly hot. Whether a given pepper ends up being hot or mild depends on the amount of water and sunlight it receives during its growth.

The peppers are customarily fried in oil and served as tapas.